Thursday, February 20, 2014

Thu Feb 20th Todays News

Piers Akerman correctly describes the enormity of Thomson's lies to parliament. The cost to the Australian economy of prolonging the ALP government will never be redressed fairly. But he should serve time. And if he does, maybe he will come to love the world he is in, rather than charging low paid workers for it. 

Andrew Bolt discusses Kerry's ridiculous decision to place trust in a thief regarding AGW matters. Apparently Australia does not have a quota of racist psychiatrists. There is a strong possibility that the new senate election in WA will harm freedoms by preventing the Abbott administration legislative freedom. ABC find another person who did not witness an atrocity by the detention administration. There is demonstrably no difference between BDS advocacy and anti semitism. Thomson illustrates how ALP is weak on union corruption. Tasmania's electoral system may be broken. The next ALP PM is probably not in parliament. Union is upset that taxpayers don't subsidise workers to $30k above award. 
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Hatches
Matches
Despatches
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Craig Thomson’s abuse of privilege is an affront to the people

Piers Akerman – Thursday, February 20, 2014 (7:44pm)

WHILE disgraced former Health Services Union official and Labor MP Craig Thomson faces sentencing next month, ordinary Australians have the rare opportunity to make their feelings about this convicted fraudster felt right now.

Icon Arrow Continue reading 'Craig Thomson’s abuse of privilege is an affront to the people'
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Why did John Kerry’s global warming guru hide himself in China?

Andrew Bolt February 20 2014 (6:22pm)

Bret Stephens on US Secretary of State John Kerry’s bizarre choice of global warming guru - a shadowy insider who cleaned up big on the alarmism:
The weirdest thing about John Kerry’s weekend speech on climate-change—other than the fact that this is the same guy who in 1997 voted to forbid the U.S. from signing the Kyoto Protocol—is that it begins by quoting something Maurice Strong said at the U.N.’s 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro: “Every bit of evidence I’ve seen persuades me that we are on a course leading to tragedy.”
Maurice who?
Mr. Strong, a former oil executive from Canada..., was for many years the U.N.’s ultimate mandarin. He organized many of its environmental mega-confabs, including the 1972 Stockholm Conference and the 1992 Rio summit, before rising to become Kofi Annan’s right-hand man. At various times Mr. Strong has served as director at the World Economic Forum, chairman of the Earth Council and the World Resources Institute, vice chairman of the Chicago Climate Exchange and chairman of the China Carbon Corporation, to name just a few of his many prominent affiliations.
In 2005 it emerged that Mr. Strong, who was the chairman of the U.N. panel that created the Office of the Iraq Program, had accepted a check for close to $1 million from a South Korean businessman named Tongsun Park, who in the 1970s had been involved in an effort to bribe U.S. politicians. Mr. Strong claimed that the check, from a Jordanian bank, was meant as an investment in a family company that later went bankrupt. Mr. Park (who also sublet office space from Mr. Strong) later went to prison for trying to bribe U.N. officials overseeing the Oil-for-Food program that was propping up Saddam Hussein’s regime in Iraq. Mr. Strong was accused of no wrongdoing and has denied involvement in Oil-for-Food. He left the U.N. that year and moved to Beijing.
Draw your own conclusions.
Ask yourself: Is this a guy who deserves a shout-out from the U.S. Secretary of State?
(Thanks to reader Geoff.) 
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Things I’d like to discuss

Andrew Bolt February 20 2014 (6:06pm)

Free speech, The politics of race

There’s a really interesting and important discussion we should be able to have about this:
INCOMING Canberra University chancellor Tom Calma has urged ordinary citizens to financially back scholarships for indigenous students, noting the country still has only one Aboriginal psychiatrist. 
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Abbott’s new Senate could get less helpful

Andrew Bolt February 20 2014 (3:12pm)

The Liberals could only go backwards:
WEST Australians will go back to the polls after the High Court declared “absolutely void’’ the disputed result of the state’s Senate election…
In September, the Liberal Party won three Senate positions in Western Australia, but it is widely expected that the position of the third Liberal, Senator-elect Linda Reynolds, will be at risk.
UPDATE
A reminder of the state of play. The Senate in July was to have the Coalition needing six of the eight seats held by independents and Palmer United Party members who lean largely to the conservative or libertarian side.
Clive Palmer originally won one WA seat to give him a crucial bloc of three of those eight seats. The Abbott Government would have to get Palmer’s agreement to break any logjam caused by a joint Greens-Labor front.
If the Liberals now lose one of the three seats they won at the election, as is possible, to a Left-leaning candidate they will be in some trouble. The would then need the votes of every single Palmer Senator and cross bencher to beat the opposition of the Left.
The best the Liberals can hope for is that they retain all three seats and that Palmer loses to a rationalist or even conservative independent in the crapshoot of preference swapping. That way the Government could beat even Clive Palmer’s no-vote. But the chances.... 
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ABC finds another boat people witness who wasn’t

Andrew Bolt February 20 2014 (12:36pm)

Boat people policy, Media

The ABC’s 7.30 yesterday:
CONOR DUFFY: Fresh accounts from inside the Manus Island detention centre emerged today. Iranian-Australian interpreter Azita Bokan was at the centre. She claims it was calm until detainees were told on Sunday they wouldn’t be resettled in Australia or Papua New Guinea.
AZITA BOKAN, INTERPRETER: They had no hope. Their hope was gone. You could see their sickness in the camp.
SCOTT MORRISON: That was never true and they were told what the standing policy was, and that is that they would be settled in Papua New Guinea.
CONOR DUFFY: Ms Bokan says she was escorted from the centre after protesting about security staff hitting detainees.
AZITA BOKAN: When they walking out, I see people with the Band-Aid, some of them not even Band-Aid, but blood, was too much blood on shirts, especially the one on a wheelchair, the amount of blood was like you could have not really hold yourself together.
But today in Fairfax:
Ms Bokan says she did not witness the violence, but was in the area where the injured were taken,...
Bokan still claims in Fairfax:
‘’Definitely, 100 per cent, I stand by the statement that the local people, including some employed by [security contractor] G4S, they were the ones who caused this drama,’’ Ms Bokan said after flying out of Manus Island on Wednesday.
The PNG Prime Minister disagrees:
Prime Minister Peter O’Neill yesterday… rejected suggestions that villagers in Manus were involved in the disturbances at the asylum processing centre in Manus.... “At no time did the good people of Manus get involved.”
Bokan again in Fairfax:
‘’There was blood everywhere. The number injured was horrific: people with massive head injuries, at least one with a slashed throat,’’ she said.
Immigration Minister Scott Morrison says he’s seen no reports of any such thing:
I have no reports of a person’s throat being slit.
Has the ABC yet again leapt to believe an atrocity monger only too ready to help it attack the Abbott Government’s successful border policies? And is Fairfax yet again doing the same? 
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No discount for the Jew from Israel

Andrew Bolt February 20 2014 (10:46am)

It is increasingly hard to tell the difference between the Greens-backed Boycott Divestment and Sanctions movement and old-fashioned anti-Semitism.
Australian company Cinematic Strings advertises a product:
Cinematic Strings 2 is a completely redesigned and updated version of the original orchestral strings sample library. Whilst retaining the warm luscious tones produced in the world class Verbrugghen Hall of the Sydney Conservatorium, the new version features a sleek new interface and even smoother legato.
It offers a discount to students:

Supporting Students and Institutions Worldwide
We believe that the latest technology should be readily available to the education sector to facilitate learning and to keep training up-to-date and relevant to industry requirements. For this reason we offer a range of individual educational discounts to both teachers and students; we also have tailored packages available for universities and colleges that seek to incorporate a professional-level string library into their program.
And then it sends this reply to a Jewish student placing an order:
Hi Yossela,
I am very, very sorry but I will not be able to provide you with a student discount. We support the BDS movement worldwide and the cultural boycott against Israel until Israel ceases its illegal settlement activities in the West Bank and ceases its discrimination against the Palestinian people. Please see this website for further information http://www.bdsmovement.net/activecamps/cultural-boycott.
Please understand that this is not in any way directed at you personally and we have heard from many Israeli students who have been very sympathetic towards the Palestinian people. However we are fairly powerless here in Australia to act on behalf of the victims of oppression and so the BDS is the only way we can have a voice.
We wish you all the best in your future musical endeavours.
Kindest regards,
Alex and the CS team.
For the company to say this decision “is not in any way directed at you personally” is to actually explain one of the offensive things about it. Yossela is not being judged as an individual but as an Israeli, and specifically a Jewish Israeli. (Would the ban apply to him were he an Israeli Arab?) This is the tribalism of the Left - a tribalism that strips us all of our individuality and our individual worth.
Moreover, when that tribalism is then put into the service of a movement aimed at only one side in a conflict involving at least two parties, the other of which uses terrorism and preaches a religious hatred of its enemy, we must ask what truly lies behind this BDS movement. It smells like something very old and putrid.
But good news: it didn’t take long after this issue hit the Internet for Cinematic Strings to think again:
While we stand by our reasons, we can see now that this action itself may be construed as discriminatory, and therefore we will make discounts available to all students regardless of location. If Yossela would like to contact us again we will make the discount available to him.
(Thanks to readers Jill and Stephen Dawson.) 
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Krauthammer on Obama’s “settled science”

Andrew Bolt February 20 2014 (10:43am)

The arrogance - the stupidity - of people who claim global warming science is “settled”.
(Thanks to reader Alan RM Jones.) 
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Fairfax writer: one death under Abbott worse than 1000 under Labor

Andrew Bolt February 20 2014 (9:29am)

Jacqueline Maley of the Sydney Morning Herald says it’s morally worse that one boat people died under the Abbott Government’s policies than that more than 1000 died under Labor’s:
The people who were drowning off those boats, off Christmas Island and so forth, which was horrendous and awful and nobody wanted to see, they were doing that sort of on their own watch, if you like.
This is a person who’s died and the 77 of so people who’ve been injured, they were under our care… That’s a strong moral difference to me.
Maley’s argument - and selective indignation - is not that much more sophisticated than that of Greens Senator Sarah Hanson-Young:
Greens child-Senator Sarah Hanson-Young in 2011 when another 200 boat people are lured to their deaths by Labor policies: 
Pressed on whether the Greens accepted responsibility for the tragedy, Senator Hanson-Young said: “Of course not. Tragedies happen, accidents happen.”
Greens child-Senator Sarah Hanson-Young today after learning our navy accidentally entered Indonesian waters in safely returning dozens of boat people to Indonesia in line with Liberal policies:

The minister is begging for forgiveness while carrying on with a policy that was always going to lead to this type of disaster.
Maley’s argument relies on Labor being able to wash its hands of the utterly predictable - even inevitable - consequences of a policy to weaken our border laws. She believes Labor holds no moral responsibility for luring more than 1000 people to their deaths, any more than, I guess, a gun shop owner bears moral responsibility for the consequences of selling machineguns to bikies or a chemist for selling 20 packets of Pentobarbital to a weeping widow. She believes Labor cannot be blamed for deaths that it was warned would occur under its policy, was warned was occurring under its policy, and which it finally conceded had occurred as a consequence of its policy.
I don’t think that argument washes, particularly when the man who died at Manus Island this week also seems to have been killed in a wild brawl instigated by the detainees themselves and finished by PNG police. And especially not when we are comparing just one death to more than 1000.

UPDATE
Reader john of gaunt:
You’re not under someone’s care if you forcibly choose to leave that care. Unless the argument is that the centre needs to have stronger walls.
(Thanks to reader Sparks.) 
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Thomson shows Labor weak on corrupt unions

Andrew Bolt February 20 2014 (7:34am)

Politics - federal

FORMER Labor MP Craig Thomson had been found guilty at last and we can get on with the real question. What’s this about Labor? 

Why did it for years protect Thomson when his guilt stank to the heavens?
Indeed, the royal commission into union corruption should investigate why Labor has been so soft on so much union lawlessness. Thomson is only the most obvious example.
(Read full article here.) 
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This mad and bad carbon tax must go

Andrew Bolt February 20 2014 (7:30am)

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HOW many more manufacturing workers must be sacked, thanks to green policies that only pretend to stop global warming? 

How many of the jobless won’t be able to heat or cool their homes, with these same mad policies helping to hike power prices by 110 per cent in only five years?
And all this pain to make no difference to the world’s temperature. What a fraud.
True, the carbon tax and less-known Renewable Energy Target did not themselves kill Alcoa’s Point Henry smelter or Toyota’s Australian plants this month.
But the carbon tax alone cost Alcoa $137 million last year. How brainless is that, when its Australian smelters were already battling to survive competition from leaner competitors overseas?
The carbon tax also cost Toyota $115 a car. How stupid is that, when Australian-made cars were already struggling to compete against cheaper imports?
Apologists for the carbon tax claim it’s nothing compared with everything else smashing our manufacturers — a high dollar, green tape, crazy workplace restrictions and bloody-minded unions.
But it’s a straw breaking the back of a lot of camels.
(Read full article here.) 
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Tasmania needs a system that produces stronger leaders

Andrew Bolt February 20 2014 (6:15am)

There is something sick in Tasmania’s electoral system when such a lead in the popular vote is likely to deliver the Liberals majority government next month only by a whisker:
[A]n analysis of a [ReachTEL] poll published by The Saturday Mercury last weekend suggests the Liberals would win a clear majority of 14 seats, Labor only six, the Greens four or five and the PUP potentially one. The poll, of 2912 Tasmanians, has the Liberals on 47.2 per cent of the vote to Labor’s 24.6, the Greens 17.2 and the Palmer United Party 7.5.
Under Tasmania’s Hare-Clark electoral system, each of the state’s five electorates return five MPs, with parties running tickets and the quota to get elected set at 16.7 per cent of the vote.
Tasmania’s system almost guarantees the need for coalitions to govern, with the inevitable uncertain leadership and a dodging of consequences by the junior partner - too often the Greens:
Giddings failed to deliver her full promise: bravely beginning a clampdown on government spending, but ultimately relenting under the pressure of union bosses and a nervous and near-sighted caucus.
For the past four years, Labor’s power-sharing deal with the Greens has alienated its core base…
The Greens have suffered some decline in support as a result of wearing unpopular decisions as a part of government. But the minor party has fared far better than Labor in terms of quarantining its political brand from cross-contamination by its power-sharing partner.
Tasmania seems to me a state with an electoral system designed to never produce the strong leadership it needs to dig it out of a hole as big as the one it’s now in.  
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The next Prime Minister after Abbott doesn’t look like Shorten

Andrew Bolt February 20 2014 (5:51am)

Niki Savva on the field of candidates to replace Tony Abbott:
As treasurer, [Joe] Hockey is so far performing well. He would be in front of a crowded field of contenders if Tony Abbott fell off his bike tomorrow…
If he doesn’t [eventually make it], and if his immediate frontbench competitors like Julie Bishop, Malcolm Turnbull and Scott Morrison have either left the scene or fail the many tests before them, there are still others - Christian Porter for one - who could be groomed for the job. The point of this is that right now in the parliament sits the next Coalition prime minister.
But is Labor’s next prime minister in Parliament? Savva is less sure:
[Shorten should] do an about-face on the carbon tax and the mining tax… He could say anything really, even we wuz wrong, it doesn’t matter - as long as he changes the story and begins to repair early negative impressions of his leadership which mark him, among other things, as a captive of the unions at a time they really stink. Craig Thomson’s conviction strengthens - not weakens - the case for a royal commission into union corruption. If he had the guts, Shorten would back it…
I do know if he wants to realise the decades-long hype about him one day becoming prime minister, he won’t get there by doing what he’s doing now.
UPDATE
Health Services Union whistleblower Marco Bolano agrees - Bill Shorten should back the royal commission into union corruption:
CRAIG Thomson’s conviction over his dishonest dealing with Health Services Union resources should be cause for me to celebrate. But it’s not. 

In 2012 Thomson abused the privilege he enjoyed as a federal MP to allege that I threatened to set him up “with a bunch of hookers” and, along with another HSU whistleblower, Kathy Jackson, had executed an intricate plot to frame him…

Thomson’s lies were believed only in the upper echelons of the federal Labor Party and some nuts in the blogosphere…
While opposing a royal commission into union governance, Bill Shorten announced himself captain of the “few bad apples” team by arguing that only the police should investigate alleged union wrongdoing… Giving police more resources to investigate union corruption is a good idea, but while he was the federal minister responsible for union regulation Shorten never thought to do that…
Members of the [HSU’s] national finance committee ... supervised Thomson’s spending (including an unauthorised $250,000 to Thomson’s ALP campaign…
The leaderships of a plethora of unions that used official resources in HSU elections need to explain how it’s in their members’ interests that their money is wasted in internecine manoeuvres designed to gain ALP power for a handful of union heavies. And the Fair Work Commission should explain how it has come to be so irredeemably useless in policing misconduct, including the delayed and botched investigation of Thomson himself. None of these are matters for the police.
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The queue in Indonesia is shrinking

Andrew Bolt February 20 2014 (5:45am)

The message is getting out:
Monthly applications for asylum-seeker registration handled by the UN High Commissioner for Refugees office in Jakarta — overwhelmingly the busiest in Indonesia — dropped 71 per cent between February 2013 and last month.
The monthly totals of asylum-seekers newly registered throughout Indonesia fell almost 44 per cent in that time to 434 people in January.
Some way to go, though. 
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SPC union furious taxpayers won’t subsidise wages $30,000 above the award

Andrew Bolt February 20 2014 (5:31am)

I don’t know what the Abbott Government really said, but do know it’s not the role of government to hand over taxpayers’ money so a dying company can keep paying workers $30,000 a year above the award:
The Abbott government pressed SPC Ardmona to slash pay for workers by as much as 40 per cent under a radical bailout plan for the food processor.
Three union officials told Fairfax Media they had meetings with SPC Ardmona managing director Peter Kelly before Christmas in which Mr Kelly said he was being pressured by the Abbott government to put workers on the award if the company wanted a $25 million subsidy…
Industry Minister Ian Macfarlane refused to directly answer questions on the issue…
If SPC Ardmona workers had been moved on to the award, pay for a level-two process worker would have been cut from about $50,000 a year to $33,000. For higher-paid maintenance workers, the falls would have been even more dramatic, dropping from as much as $85,000 a year to about $50,000.
The lack of self-awareness here from the union officials complaining to the too-sympathetic Age is astonishing:
Another union official who met Mr Kelly in mid-December, the ETU’s Damian King, confirmed the same. He said the union had offered a two-year wage freeze to try to keep its members in work but SPC Ardmona said it would cut 73 maintenance staff and outsource the work.
So the union is insisting that a company in desperate strife keep paying wages way above the award - and above those of competitors - even though it means the workers it represents get replaced by cheaper contractors. And we’re supposed to subsidise this?
That this effrontery is treated seriously in The Age shows how completely out of touch with commercial reality that paper’s journalistic culture is. 
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Iran tells Australia to leave the killing of Iranians to the mullahs

Andrew Bolt February 20 2014 (12:05am)

Iran shows its commitment to the safety of its citizens:
Australian ambassador Paul Foley met with Iranian officials this week after the death of the 24-year-old Iranian asylum seeker on Papua New Guinea’s Manus Island following a riot on Monday.
The ministry’s consular director, Seyyed Hossein Mirfakhar, reportedly expressed Iran’s “protest and discontent” about the “practice of violence and mistreatment” which led to the death.
Iran shows its commitment to the safety of its citizens:
An Arab-Iranian poet and human rights activist, Hashem Shaabani, has been executed for being an “enemy of God” and threatening national security, according to local human rights groups.
Shaabani and a man named Hadi Rashedi were hanged in unidentified prison on January 27, rights groups have said…
Iran executed 40 people over two weeks of that month, according to Amnesty International. According to the Iran Human Rights Documentation Centre (IHRDC) more than 300 people have been executed since Hasan Rouhani became president in August.
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A festival that might be improved by a boycott

Andrew Bolt February 19 2014 (7:26pm)

The kind of people who’d pull out could be just the kind you’d want to prune from a serious art festival for the truly thoughtful:
Artists involved in this year’s Biennale of Sydney have threatened to pull out unless event organisers abandon a sponsorship deal with a company involved in offshore detention centres

The Biennale of Sydney, which starts on March 21, lists Transfield as a major sponsor. The company holds contracts with the Immigration Department to provide services at detention facilities at Nauru, such as management, maintenance and perimeter security
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Terrible ABC scandal

Andrew Bolt February 19 2014 (6:56pm)

The ABC will have a field day with this:
A HIGH-LEVEL review has found that Royal Australian Navy and Customs vessels breached Indonesian sovereignty six times during counter people smuggling operations in December and January. ...
Those breaches occurred during tow-back operations when the ships were trying to get asylum seeker vessels as close as possible to a landfall.
It is shocking, simply shocking, that naval vessels crewed by men who openly torture boat people repeatedly trampled on the sacred sovereignty of our angelic Indonesian neighbours just to lessen the risk of boat people drowning on their return to shore.
What a scandal. For the ABC.
UPDATE
The ABC’s PM yesterday seems to be campaigning, not just reporting:
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Today again:
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Those eyes .. asking that question .. "why?" - ed
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A Ranger spacecraft (NASA)
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Events[edit]

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“Dear friends, since God so loved us, we also ought to love one another. No one has ever seen God; but if we love one another, God lives in us and his love is made complete in us.” - 1 John 4:11-12
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Morning and Evening by Charles Spurgeon
February 19: Morning
"Thus saith the Lord God; I will yet for this be enquired of by the house of Israel, to do it for them." - Ezekiel 36:37
Prayer is the forerunner of mercy. Turn to sacred history, and you will find that scarcely ever did a great mercy come to this world unheralded by supplication. You have found this true in your own personal experience. God has given you many an unsolicited favour, but still great prayer has always been the prelude of great mercy with you. When you first found peace through the blood of the cross, you had been praying much, and earnestly interceding with God that he would remove your doubts, and deliver you from your distresses. Your assurance was the result of prayer. When at any time you have had high and rapturous joys, you have been obliged to look upon them as answers to your prayers. When you have had great deliverances out of sore troubles, and mighty helps in great dangers, you have been able to say, "I sought the Lord, and he heard me, and delivered me from all my fears." Prayer is always the preface to blessing. It goes before the blessing as the blessing's shadow. When the sunlight of God's mercies rises upon our necessities, it casts the shadow of prayer far down upon the plain. Or, to use another illustration, when God piles up a hill of mercies, he himself shines behind them, and he casts on our spirits the shadow of prayer, so that we may rest certain, if we are much in prayer, our pleadings are the shadows of mercy. Prayer is thus connected with the blessing to show us the value of it. If we had the blessings without asking for them, we should think them common things; but prayer makes our mercies more precious than diamonds. The things we ask for are precious, but we do not realize their preciousness until we have sought for them earnestly.

"Prayer makes the darken'd cloud withdraw;
Prayer climbs the ladder Jacob saw;
Gives exercise to faith and love;
Brings every blessing from above."
Evening
"He first findeth his own brother Simon." - John 1:41
This case is an excellent pattern of all cases where spiritual life is vigorous. As soon as a man has found Christ, he begins to find others. I will not believe that thou hast tasted of the honey of the gospel if thou canst eat it all thyself. True grace puts an end to all spiritual monopoly. Andrew first found his own brother Simon, and then others. Relationship has a very strong demand upon our first individual efforts. Andrew, thou didst well to begin with Simon. I doubt whether there are not some Christians giving away tracts at other people's houses who would do well to give away a tract at their own--whether there are not some engaged in works of usefulness abroad who are neglecting their special sphere of usefulness at home. Thou mayst or thou mayst not be called to evangelize the people in any particular locality, but certainly thou art called to see after thine own servants, thine own kinsfolk and acquaintance. Let thy religion begin at home. Many tradesmen export their best commodities--the Christian should not. He should have all his conversation everywhere of the best savour; but let him have a care to put forth the sweetest fruit of spiritual life and testimony in his own family. When Andrew went to find his brother, he little imagined how eminent Simon would become. Simon Peter was worth ten Andrews so far as we can gather from sacred history, and yet Andrew was instrumental in bringing him to Jesus. You may be very deficient in talent yourself, and yet you may be the means of drawing to Christ one who shall become eminent in grace and service. Ah! dear friend, you little know the possibilities which are in you. You may but speak a word to a child, and in that child there may be slumbering a noble heart which shall stir the Christian church in years to come. Andrew has only two talents, but he finds Peter. Go thou and do likewise.
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Today's reading: Leviticus 25, Mark 1:23-45 (NIV)

View today's reading on Bible Gateway

Today's Old Testament reading: Leviticus 25

The Sabbath Year
The LORD said to Moses at Mount Sinai, 2 "Speak to the Israelites and say to them: 'When you enter the land I am going to give you, the land itself must observe a sabbath to the LORD. 3 For six years sow your fields, and for six years prune your vineyards and gather their crops....

Today's New Testament reading: Mark 1:23-45

23 Just then a man in their synagogue who was possessed by an impure spirit cried out, 24 "What do you want with us, Jesus of Nazareth? Have you come to destroy us? I know who you are-the Holy One of God!"
25 "Be quiet!" said Jesus sternly. "Come out of him!" 26 The impure spirit shook the man violently and came out of him with a shriek....

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