Friday, May 27, 2011

News items and comments

Greens are insane. True heirs to ALP
TWO very different stories illustrate the corrosive nature of green ideology, far away from Bob Brown's "hate media" circus.
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A lousy politician
I WASN'T a bad kid at school (although I'm hoping not too many of my old teachers read this), but I wasn't the teacher's pet either.
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It is hard to know what Gillard will do, but she needs to support NZ in this
FIJI'S runaway colonel is making plans to seek political asylum in New Zealand.

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We now know Osama's last words. "wait! Stop! I know things. I can tell you about .. Aaargh."
PAKISTAN will reportedly allow a CIA forensics team to search Osama bin Laden's former compound.

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Apparently dumping one pedophile hasn't cleared the trash
SA UNIONS accuses Treasurer Jack Snelling of trying to "divide and conquer" unions before the Budget.

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ALP government fails in South Australia
BUDGET cuts have hit a telephone service that parents use for urgent advice more than 95,000 times a year.

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Overland must go
TOP cop Simon Overland tried to persuade the Office of Police Integrity to water down a damning report on the force's handling of crime statistics.
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Of course they were. One needs good parents
AN 11-year-old girl has told of her grief at losing both parents in a car crash.

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The illegal trade Gillard favors is worse
FORMER ambassador to the WTO lobbying Malaysia to help fight the Gillard government's plan for cigarette plain packaging.
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We all suffer from ALP mismanagement
PROPERTY OWNERS will pay more in taxes and levies on the back of a hike in the value of the state's property.
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I am long term public transport user .. And single. Proving the rule
IF YOU are reading this on your way to work, then your marriage may already be in trouble.

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Does God play a role in it?
DANNIELLE Miller has inspired thousands of teen girls to value their inner beauty.

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Everyone suffers under ALP
MORE than half of Australians believe the gap between rich and poor is growing wider and two-thirds know someone struggling to make ends meet.
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Well done Patrick
THE wharfies union has lifted its industrial action on the waterfront after ports operator Patrick refused to pay workers for any work at all.
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They did a good job and I thank them. But I must point out their lives were not on hold.
THEY'VE put their lives on hold for eight long months to help keep the peace in a foreign land - and yesterday reservists from the NSW-based 8th Brigade were well aware of the task at hand as they far...
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Tim flattery is erasing the data.
AUTUMN, what autumn? The way it's been in Sydney this month you'd think it was winter already.

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They brought a gun to a public place to fight. They didn't care who they hurt. And a good man died.
IT'S a good thing David Knight is a big man, for the pain goes deep.

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A pack hunted the victim at a known spot and despatched him.
A COMANCHERO bikie accused of murdering a man in a brawl at Sydney Airport was actually attacked by the victim, a jury heard yesterday.
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Healthy changes
THE state government is planning an attack on generous public service conditions as part of its wages policy.
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ALP tax a good gas
TAXI fares will start increasing in Sydney from next year when the federal government imposes a fuel tax on LPG for the first time, the Taxi Council has warned.
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Lemming instinct? Both recent youth train tragedies were located in ALP territory.
A TEENAGE boy was knocked unconscious and has serious head injuries after being slammed into the side of a passing express train last night.
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ALP are lousy managers
WHEN the North West Rail Link was first announced in 1998 by the then-Labor government, it was a 7km track from Epping to Castle Hill, with an estimated cost of more than $350 million.
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There is room to grow, but we need a Bradfield style scheme.
AUSTRALIAN children will become "battery kids'' with no backyards as housing prices soar beyond the average couple's reach, warns entrepreneur Dick Smith.
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Figures monkeys might cure schizophrenia when scientists haven't.
LIKE humans, monkeys also wonder about what might have been, according to a new study by Yale researchers.
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She won't be Margaret Thatcher, but she could be great. Here is hope and change.
A FEATURE-film-length documentary on Sarah Palin's political career will debut in Iowa next month, reviving speculation that the former Alaska governor could jump into the 2012 presidential race after...
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The ALP have trouble finding their own bums when it is dark
IT seems the only people who can't find the "missing" State Coach are the public servants who handed over taxpayer money for its construction.
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Over what time frame are two economy tickets a year worth $100k?
QANTAS pilots each stand to pocket almost $200,000 on average extra if the airline caves in to their demands, with the lion's share going on two free tickets a year to anywhere in the world.
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I believe the children are our future
THE campaign for new special pre-schools for disadvantaged children has attracted 2500 supporters, including actor Jai Laga'aia.
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ARL fans are the losers
THE NRL betting scandal continues to escalate, with sacked Canterbury prop Ryan Tandy facing a new charge of trying to manipulate the opening score in last year's contentious Cowboys-Bulldogs match as..
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Granny apples are better cooked.
EDNA Spurway turns 101 next week and attributes her long life to good genes and apples - granny smith apples.
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It is a cost cutting measure. Security costs.
THE federal government is believed to have signed a contract to outsource the management of defence base operations in the Middle East and Afghanistan to the foreign company running Australia's immigr...
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The bell rings and cannot be unrung, or stilled.
IT was the hardest secret Michael Siaa ever had to keep. Greeting his wife at Sydney Airport after she returned yesterday from a holiday in Samoa, Mr Siaa's face was filled with joy - but his heart wa...
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O'Farrell is singing my song!
THE North West Rail Link has been reborn -- but now it is longer, with more stations and parking for thousands of cars.
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A little bit pregnant are you girls? You were warned. Now we all pay the price.
www.theaustralian.com.au
QUEENSLAND Premier Anna Bligh has urged Julia Gillard to avoid "radical and extreme politics", warning that Greens' proposals to ban new coalmines would cause "a social and economic catastrophe" for her state.
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Unemployment at 20%. Youth Unemployment at 45%. This is where Julia and Bob are taking us.
www.youtube.com
In Spain the ruling Socialist Party has failed "economic crisis" Unemployment highest rate in Europe 21% youth 45% spain is also a part of the EU's ETS Fail


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Awesome
www.fairfieldchampion.com.au
Police have tracked stolen computers to a home in Canley Vale after the owner activated a tracking application on her iPhone.
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Netanyahu is a good leader. Obama could learn from him, if he weren't avoiding him.
www.foxnews.com
Israel's prime minister gets the last word in a speech to a Joint Meeting of Congress.

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Be patient. We are coming to find you. Hang in there.
www.foxnews.com
When there's no answer, again and again, at some point you have to stop calling. NASA announced Tuesday (May 24) that it will cease its daily attempts to contact Spirit, a robotic rover on Mars that went incommunicado last year.
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Welcome to the EU, Serbia. I want a fair trial for Ratko, before he is hung.
www.foxnews.com
Serbia on Thursday arrested a man believed to be the fugitive war criminal Ratko Mladic following an anonymous tip, according to B92 radio station.
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A tragedy for which we need answers.
www.dailytelegraph.com.au
A man has been charged with the stabbing murder of a teenage boy at a railway station in Sydney's west last night.
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There is a lot of dead wood among the judiciary .. thanks to the ALP
www.dailytelegraph.com.au
THE NSW Judicial Commission has recommended the removal of magistrate Jennifer Betts on grounds of "misbehaviour or incapacity".
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We live in amazing times
www.news.com.au
NASA is setting out to search for traces of life on an asteroid which could potentially wipe it out.

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It isn't that she benefited from the attention. She has shrunk in office. But he suffers when he isn't in the spotlight. So Australians pay more so he suffers for Gillard.
www.news.com.au
AN episode of a television series showing how the Australian Federal Police protected the Prime Minister was re-shot because the star had been sacked.
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@desmondmyers Thank you for the pronunciation tip. Is it something that changes depending on location? I don't know and am saying what I have heard others say .. The Irish pronounce 'Celtic' differently from time to time ..
Source: www.youtube.com
Ernesto Guevara de la Serna (June 14, 1928[1] -- October 9, 1967), commonly known as Che Guevara, El Che or just Che was an Argentine-born Marxist revolutionary, political figure, and leader of Cuban and internationalist guerrillas. But that is...

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‎@desmondmyers No, people also remember how Che raped and pillaged through Africa and South America wherever people were foolish enough to welcome him. Everything I have read is documented. I understand he was your hero. Your hero was a despicable ...
Source: www.youtube.com
Guevara arrived in Mexico City in early September 1954, and shortly thereafter renewed his friendship with Ñico López and the other Cuban exiles whom he had known in Guatemala. In June 1955, López introduced him to Raúl Castro. Several weeks later...

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WE live in great times
www.foxnews.com
Researchers at the University of Alabama have located seventeen lost pyramids and more than 3,000 ancient settlements in Egypt after studying images produced by a state-of-the-art infrared technique.
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Democrats still don't have an affordable alternative
www.foxnews.com
The Senate has rejected a controversial House budget plan for turning Medicare into a voucher-like program for future beneficiaries.
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Hicks and useful idiots

Miranda Devine – Thursday, May 26, 11 (08:45 am)

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LISTENING to David Hicks’ speech to the Sydney Writers’ Festival last weekend, you’d think he’d been over in Afghanistan wiping the brow of AIDS sufferers and holding the hand of leprosy victims.

Certainly those useful idiots of the audience who gave him a standing ovation seemed to think Hicks was the Australian bloke version of Mother Theresa.

But just because some naive people think that being locked up in Guantanamo Bay and smacked around a bit was overly harsh punishment for suspected terrorists captured in Afghanistan just after September 11, 2011, that doesn’t mean they’re innocent.

We have seen from Osama bin Laden’s handwritten notes, discovered in his Abbottabad compound after he was killed last month, that the al-Qaeda leader looked for men just like Hicks to carry out his murderous attacks.

He looked for non-Arabs who would blend into local populations.

Dinky di Aussie Hicks, aka Mohammed Dawood, the Muslim convert who was also handy with a gun, made a perfect candidate.

Arabs arouse too much suspicion, wrote bin Laden in his journal, urging his senior lieutenants to time a big attack on a train in the US to mark the 10th anniversary this year of the September 11 atrocity.

He wanted them to find suggestible misfits and losers from Western countries who could be flattered and moulded into terrorists.

These young men didn’t walk around wearing devil horns. They were for the most part pathetic, like Hicks.

Bin Laden deliberately recruited weak-brained young men who would be prepared to strap a bomb to their torsos and walk into a hotel lobby and pull the pin, or who would fire directly into a crowd of strangers at a railway station.

Or even on a crowd of book lovers at a writers’ festival. Why do they think they would be immune?

FLASHBACK: The truth about David Hicks.

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THE MONEY MAKER

Tim Blair – Friday, May 27, 11 (06:02 am)

Former Liberal MP Ross Cameron invites SMH readers to follow the money:

Flannery trousers $180,000 a year from the Prime Minister to heighten community angst, and her re-election depends on his success. Panasonic, the producer of energy-intensive, carbon-rich electronic goods, sponsors his chair at Macquarie University. While that money does not go to him directly, he has boasted of “carrying the flag for Panasonic in everything … I do’’ before clarifying that ‘’I havenot advocated Panasonic as a company in my public engagements as chief commissioner, nor have I done so in my books or TV work.’’ Clear as mud.

The criticism that ‘’money talks’’ in policy debates about energy-intensive industries ought also to be directed at the academic and scientific establishment. If we were to remove all the scientists whose teaching and research programs derive taxpayer funds to pursue the anthropogenic thesis, I suspect the ‘’consensus’’ would be weaker. It doesn’t mean the thesis is wrong, but the transparency being practised by the scientists falls woefully short of that expected of journalists, politicians and company directors.

Reaction to this piece from SMH readers – and possibly SMH staff – will be intriguing.

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404 DAYS UNTIL LABOR’S COAL-BUSTER TAX

Tim Blair – Friday, May 27, 11 (05:41 am)

When jobs are on the line, unions prefer to mine:

Tony Maher, mining president of the Construction Forestry Mining and Energy Union, yesterday described Greens deputy leader Christine Milne’s push for a ban on new coalmine ban as “a pathetically shallow analysis that is unworthy of any serious player or party”.

“It confirms what the Prime Minister said about them not being a serious party of government,” he said …

“It’s not like we can dictate the world’s coal use,” Mr Maher said. “Our economy is completely dependent on the resources boom for the next two decades.

“We’ll reduce emissions by the middle of the century. But we won’t doing it by putting our mining industry out of business.”

Interesting. Maher authorised this CFMEU ad before the 2007 election:

The CFMEU seems to have changed its view. Meanwhile, according to the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences, there are currently 94 planned new mining projects in the energy and minerals sectors, worth a total of $173.5 billion. That’s a lot of business out of which to be put. Advertising might again cash in:

Relations with the $50 billion coal industry appear to have hit a new low with the Australian Coal Association gathering funds for a multimillion-dollar anti-carbon tax advertising campaign after firing off an angry letter to the Climate Change Minister, Greg Combet, last week.

The letter dated May 18 from its chairman John Pelger said the figures that officials were using to calculate the cost of the carbon tax for coalminers were ‘’simply wrong’’, that they were assuming the industry could use technology that did not exist ‘’at commercial scale anywhere’’ and that unless the government changed its scheme the result would be ‘’job losses and mine closures’’.

Officially the association says it is continuing to talk to the government, but sources said money was being collected to launch an anti-tax campaign.

Maybe the CFMEU could help with casting.

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AND POINTLESS IS THE WINNER

Tim Blair – Friday, May 27, 11 (05:19 am)

Gamble your way to carbon tax wealth:

Sportingbet Australia has opened a market on what carbon price the committee will eventually agree on and has installed $20 to $25 a tonne as the $1.60 favourite.

Punters can get $3.25 for a $25 to $30 price, while $20 or under is on the next line at $3.50.

The bookies clearly don’t think the fixed carbon price will start at more than $30 a tonne – they’re offering $7 for that result.

This might be the only chance that “ordinary folk” – as Tony Jones describes them – will have of turning a profit on the whole carbon deal.

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WE COULD DO WITHOUT BERKELEY

Tim Blair – Friday, May 27, 11 (05:00 am)

Australia – the new California?

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INTIMIDATION BY INFORMATION

Tim Blair – Friday, May 27, 11 (03:52 am)

It’s the worst crime yet:

Freedom of information laws are being misused to harass scientists and should be re-examined by the government, according to the president of the Royal Society.

Nobel laureate Sir Paul Nurse told the Guardian that some climate scientists were being targeted by organised campaigns of requests for data and other research materials, aimed at intimidating them and slowing down research. He said the behaviour was turning freedom of information laws into a way to intimidate some scientists.

The good folks at Bishop Hill have plenty to say about this. Their information is free.

(Via Benny Peiser)

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No to carnations

Andrew Bolt – Friday, May 27, 11 (06:52 am)

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I agree with Katy Perry’s list of dressing-room demands - carnations are so last century:

An arrangement of fresh flowers is a must, consisting of white and purple hydrangeas and pink and white roses and peonies. Carnations are strictly forbidden.

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My quarrel is more with the palette. It’s a bit too pastel. I prefer more color - even a riot of it:

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Don’t want him? Then remove him - but not like this

Andrew Bolt – Friday, May 27, 11 (06:46 am)

The public destruction of Simon Overland is becoming unbearable to watch:

TOP cop Simon Overland tried to persuade the Office of Police Integrity to water down a damning report on the force’s handling of crime statistics.

The Chief Commissioner - who during a press conference yesterday asked “Who failed stats?” and raised his own arm - recently wrote to OPI director Michael Strong to ask him to remove one scathing criticism and to suggest other changes.

The section of the report Mr Overland wanted deleted related to an OPI finding that Victoria Police had listed almost 160,000 crimes since 1998 as being solved even though charges were never laid.

Controversy over the OPI report, which was tabled in State Parliament yesterday, comes after the Herald Sun this week revealed the force fudged official data to paint a rosier picture of crime.

There must be better ways for a Government to replace a Chief Commissioner than to watch him die by a thousand cuts. End this now.

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Taxing ourselves out of the online game

Andrew Bolt – Friday, May 27, 11 (06:36 am)

This should have huge consequences for the GST:

ONE of nation’s leading retailers claims the future of Australian retailing is online, as the country follows consumer trends already evident in the US, Europe and parts of Asia.

Pacific Brands chief executive Sue Morphet ... said online represented about 10 per cent of total sales in the UK and 8 per cent in the US, but only 3 per cent in Australia.

“That’s going to change. One reason is that an Australian dollar at or above parity with the US has made it easier for online shoppers in Australia,” she said.

If the GST is imposed on Australian online goods, but not on online imports, we’ll price ourselves out of the market. But how to monitor and police all that mail? How will consumers react to being denied some of the bargains they can see online?

At the very least, the more that shoppers go on line, the less the Government is likely to reap from the GST, given how many of the online bargains are imports, especially with our dollars where it is.

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Trust a woman to be late

Andrew Bolt – Friday, May 27, 11 (06:29 am)

Oops, that’s embarrassing. Too symbolic of this Government for comfort, too:

THE Baillieu government has failed to pass its own controversial equal opportunity bill, after Women’s Affairs Minister Mary Wooldridge missed a vote on the legislation.

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So we sit in the dark and ask: what’s it all for?

Andrew Bolt – Friday, May 27, 11 (06:25 am)

And never does the Gillard Government say what the gain for this pain will be - as in, by how much will the world’s temperatures fall, even if it unplugs your power:

THE security of electricity supplies would be at risk and power prices would be likely to rise under a carbon price if assistance measures failed to prevent the financial collapse of coal-fired generators, a report has warned.

A tax on carbon emissions could undermine investments in new low-emissions generation, if the viability of generators was undermined, according to a confidential report by investment bank Morgan Stanley.

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Sending more billions where the free insulation went

Andrew Bolt – Friday, May 27, 11 (06:19 am)

We’ve seen government funds put into one green scheme after another that’s blown out or proved next to useless - solar rebates, carbon sequestration, green car funds, green loan schemes, free insulation and more.

Now one of the key unions is demanding the Gillard Government - already dangerously tempted - spend even more on picking green winners:

In a submission to the government on the carbon pricing policy, the Australian Manufacturing Workers Union also calls for a $3.7bn low emissions industry and technology development fund to drive green jobs under a carbon pricing regime.

The call comes as the government is considering creating a multi-billion-dollar carbon bank to manage the development of low-emissions technologies in its negotiations with the Greens on the shape of the carbon pricing package.

Say goodbye to those billions.

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And so pointless

Andrew Bolt – Friday, May 27, 11 (06:04 am)

If they can’t manage a relationship...:

THE federal Coalition has been rocked by a fresh outbreak of tensions, with Malcolm Turnbull lashing out at one of Tony Abbott’s senior supporters…

Mr Turnbull has expressed fury at an internal party email in which he and four other MPs were named and shamed for missing a vote in Parliament. While the email was written by Opposition Whip Warren Entsch, the Turnbull camp yesterday was holding Mr Abbott’s office responsible....

Mr Abbott declined to answer questions about whether he had known about the letter and whether he endorsed its strong tone. A spokesman said last night: ‘’Tony had no role in drafting or sending the letter.’’

Earlier, Mr Turnbull turned up at the end of a Cancer Council function that Mr Abbott attended (see video above). Mr Abbott, after a slight and embarrassing pause, took Mr Turnbull’s outstretched hand, before departing without commenting to the media.

Turnbull supporters are playing up what they should be hosing down:

Supporters of the former Liberal leader, who said last week he still aspired to the top job, said they were convinced Mr Abbott or his staff had been involved in producing the letter.

But they said Mr Turnbull did not intend to be provoked. “The question is why Tony would want to do this,” said one source. “We’re doing well in the polls and we have Labor in trouble. Why would anyone want to draw attention away from the carbon tax?”

And Turnbull is providing all the pictures reporters may need, by confronting Entsch in Parliament:

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Obama negotiates Israel away

Andrew Bolt – Friday, May 27, 11 (05:58 am)

Alan Dershowitz on how Barack Obama betrayed Israel and delayed any peace by demanding a return to the 1967 borders, with swaps:

There is no way that Israel can agree to borders without the Palestinians also agreeing to give up any claim to a “right of return.” As Palestinian Prime Minister Fayyad Salaam once told me: each side has a major card to play and a major compromise to make; for Israel, that card is the West Bank, and the compromise is returning to the 1967 lines with agreed-upon adjustments and land swaps; for the Palestinians, that card is “the right of return,” and the compromise is an agreement that the Palestinian refugees will be settled in Palestine and not in Israel; in other words, that there will be no right to “return” to Israel.

President Obama’s formulation requires Israel to give up its card and to make a “wrenching compromise” by dismantling most of the West Bank settlements and ending its occupation of the West Bank. But it does not require the Palestinians to give up their card and to compromise on the right of return. That “extraordinarily emotional” issue is to be left to further negotiations only after the borders have been agreed to.

This temporal ordering—requiring Israel to give up the “territorial” card before the Palestinians even have to negotiate about the “return” card—is a non-starter for Israel and it is more than the Palestinians have privately asked for. Once again, President Obama, by giving the Palestinians more than they asked for, has made it difficult, if not impossible, for the Palestinians to compromise.

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The less Mary looks, the more innocent Hicks seems

Andrew Bolt – Friday, May 27, 11 (05:41 am)

Sydney Peace Foundation advisor Mary Kostakidis in The Sydney Morning Herald on Wednesday:

[David Hicks] went over to help people who were being persecuted. He is an Australian who was let down. Lashkar-e-Toiba, the group with whom he travelled to Kashmir, was years away from being declared a terrorist organisation. There is no reference to terrorist training or any training aimed at hurting civilians [in Hicks’s letters]. There is not one mention of al-Qa’ida. Did he break any law? No . . . The former prime minister John Howard, who led us into war under false pretences, a war in which many Australians were killed, also appeared at the [Sydney] writers festival, funded by taxpayers.

David Hicks in a letter home, August 10, 2000:

I got to fire hundreds of bullets. Most Muslim countries impose hanging for civilians arming themselves for conflict. There are not many countries in the world where a tourist, according to his visa, can go to stay with the army and shoot across the border at its enemy, legally.

Another letter home at the same time:

I learned about weapons such as ballistic missiles, surface-to-surface and shoulder-fired missiles, anti-aircraft and anti-tank rockets, rapid-fire heavy and light machine guns, pistols, AK47s, mines and explosives . . . I am now very well trained for jihad in weapons, some serious.

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The Liberals seems keener to kill each other than Labor

Andrew Bolt – Thursday, May 26, 11 (09:29 pm)

What a stupid, self-indulgent bit of payback by Turnbull’s enemies:

Former opposition leader Malcolm Turnbull has accused his own party of ensuring an embarrassing email about him was leaked to the media.

Tensions in the Opposition heightened last night as Mr Turnbull and four others were charged with “totally unacceptable behaviour” and of showing ‘’great disrespect’’ to the Coalition for missing a vote in Parliament.

The accusations were contained in an email sent to every Coalition MP by the Opposition whip, Warren Entsch, and his four deputies.

Ramping up the internal division today, Mr Turnbull said such an email was “a first” and he described it as a “press release”.

“[To] send a letter out like that it’s effectively a press release, that’s the obvious intent of it. That’s what happens when you send letters to half the Parliament,” Mr Turnbull told reporters.

Turnbull is senior enough to warrant a private word, not a mass-mailed rebuke - and certainly not one leaked to the media. The result: rather than hurting Turnbull, the leaker has hurt the party.

That is.... providing, of course, it was Turnbull’s enemies who did the deed…

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Hicks the hero

Andrew Bolt – Thursday, May 26, 11 (02:57 pm)

Ted Lapkin on the extraordinary love shown to David Hicks by the fools at Sydney’s Writers Festival:

David Hicks appeared at the Sydney Writers’ Festival to discuss his autobiography Guantanamo: My Journey. And along for the ride was an audience of 900 credulous fools, who gave him a standing ovation and queued at a book signing afterwards....

During his festival appearance at the weekend, Hicks claimed the first time he ever heard the name al-Qaeda was “from the lips of an interrogator in Guantanamo Bay”. But once again, he is busted by those pesky notes he penned to his family.

In a May 2001 missive he wrote: ‘’By the way I have met Osama bin Laden 20 times now, lovely brother, everything for the cause of Islam. The only reason the West calls him the most wanted Muslim is because he’s got the money to take action.’’…

It is easy to establish that David Hicks is a fraud. Far more perplexing is why purportedly intelligent people have become so morally unhinged that they see him as worthy of applause.

Equally puzzling is why any of the festival’s sponsors would want to be associated with such an event… And then there are the NSW and Australian governments, which misused taxpayer dollars to provide a platform for it.

This is not about freedom of speech. I will defend Hicks’s right to stand on whatever street corner he chooses to tell whatever lies he wishes, but I don’t want my tax dollars to pay for it…

What the writers’ festival audience seemed to ignore is that al-Qaeda would just as soon cut off their heads as look at them. The novelist Martin Amis put it well on BBC TV’s Q&A when he described the phenomenon of Western lefties making common cause with Muslim radicals: “People of liberal sympathies, stupefied by relativism, have become the apologists for a creedal wave that is racist, misogynist, homophobic, imperialist, and genocidal. To put it another way, they are up the arse of those that want them dead.”

The eagerness of this naive crowd to excuse the jihadi transgressions of David Hicks is, quite simply, masochism in the service of sadism.

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Who upset Saint Bob?

Andrew Bolt – Thursday, May 26, 11 (02:21 pm)

Hands up, the ABC staffer who dared to upset Bob Brown with a mean question at the last election:

ABC managing director Mark Scott has revealed Greens leader Bob Brown complained to him personally about the national broadcaster’s treatment of his political party.

Was it you, Kerry? Mr Jones? Mr Adams? Confess, Ms Trioli! Well, how about you, then, Robyn?

(Thanks to reader Bernie.)

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I’d love to believe it, but the credit is all theirs

Andrew Bolt – Thursday, May 26, 11 (02:17 pm)

Peter Brent is furious:

Recently, someone told me that a Labor “insider” had told them that rightwing Herald-Sun journalist, blogger and broadcaster Andrew Bolt was “worth two percent” of the vote.

He’s rght to say this is wrong. I’m not Right wing at all.

(Thanks to reader Bernie Slaterry.)

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