Saturday, February 26, 2011

Pokarekare Ana

This is in tribute to that great nation who is humbled by that earthquake in Christchurch. I could die of love for you.

Pokarekare Ana is a traditional New Zealand love song, probably communally composed about the time World War I began in 1914.

East Coast Māori song-writer Paraire Tomoana, who polished up the song in 1917 and published the words in 1921, wrote that "it emanated from the North of Auckland" and was popularised by Māori soldiers who were training near Auckland before embarking for the war in Europe.

There have been numerous claims and counterclaims regarding authorship over the years. Although the matter has never been definitively settled, guardianship of the words and music are held by the family (descendants) ofParaire Tomoana.

The Māori words have remained virtually unaltered over the decades, with only the waters in the first line being localized. For example, some versions refer to Rotorua, a town in the North Island. However, there have been many different English translations.

Pokarekare ana
Nga wai o waiapu
Whiti atu koe hine
Marino ana e

E hine e
Hoki maira
Kamate au
-i te aroha e

Tuhituhi taku rita
Tuku atu taku ringi
Kia kiti to iwi
Raru raru ana e

E hine e
Hoki maira
Kamate au
-i te aroha e

E hine e
Hoki maira
Kamate au
-i te aroha e

Kamate au
-i te aroha e

[English translation:]

Stormy are the waters
Of restless Waiapu
If you cross them, girl
They will be calmed

Oh girl
Come back to me
I could die
Of love for you

I write you my letter
I send you my ring
So your people can see
How troubled I am

Oh girl
Come back to me
I could die
Of love for you

Oh girl
Come back to me
I could die
Of love for you

I could die
Of love (for you).

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